Pardon me, is this the drive-thru lane?

Hello?? I’d like a burger and fries, please. And an iced tea.

Drive_Thru1

Um, make that EXTRA LARGE fries.

Drive_Thru2

 

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Mama and Baby (Elephants!)

I know how we all love elephants, especially their “little” babies. How would you rate the cuteness factor here on a scale of 1 to 10?

Here’s one mama and her adorable offspring on a leisurely stroll through the jungle.

Mama&Baby2

And in this picture, I think Mama Pachyderm is looking right at me. Is she trying to give me the stink eye? Is she saying “back off missy, this is my baby”?

Mama&Baby1

 

An Elephant Dust-up

I love this little five-photo series of two young-ish elephants having a little dust-up over a watering hole. (For those unfamiliar with the term “dust-up” it means a quarrel or argument.) I like using it here for obvious reasons. The dust they kick up helps capture the motion between the photos, as the elephant on the right chases the other one away.

Elephant Dust-Up 1Elephant Dust-Up 2

Look at those ears! All flared out in indignation. My watering hole! Mine!! All mine!!!Elephant Dust-Up 3Elephant Dust-Up 4Elephant Dust-Up 5

These photos were taken at Mfuwe Lodge in South Luangwa National Park, Zambia.

 

Answer to the “mystery bird” photo in my last blog: that was an African Jicana, common to southern Africa.

 

Mystery Safari Photo

Do you know what this is?  To state the obvious, yes, it’s a bird. (I have to include that comment for certain friends of mine who would immediately respond with that answer to the question. Yes, you. You know who are.)

Mystery_Bird

 

But what kind of bird? Hmmmmm……

This photo was taken in Botswana, specifically in a marshy area of the Okavango Delta.

Time for…The Birds!

Well, just one bird tonight, but I think you’ll agree that this little gal (or guy) is spectacular enough to have a blog posting all to itself.

I give you the lilac-breasted roller, one of the more common birds you’ll encounter in southern Africa. (The roller family of birds are so-named because of the acrobatic rolls they perform while flying.) lilac_bird

Isn’t she gorgeous? They’re easy to spot because of their bright plumage and because they like to perch up high in trees like this. I have many photos of these birds from most every location we visited, but this is one of my favorites (even though – if you zoom in – you’ll see the bird is not in perfect focus). There’s a couple of reasons: 1) the soft gray cloudy sky gives it a solid background for contrast and 2) because of the different textures of the two tree branches in front combined with the way they’re blurred because they are not my focal point. I do violate the rule of thirds for photography by having the bird in the center of the photo, but the branches and their textures are in the left third, drawing your eyes that way, so maybe we’ll just think of those photography rules as being more like guidelines anyway.

A leopard doesn’t change its spots…

…and we certainly wouldn’t want them to, would we? Because they are beautiful! This gal certainly is.leopard_drinking1 We encountered her on our last afternoon in the Okavango Delta, drinking from the river. She paused only briefly to check us out (look at that pink tongue!),leopard_tongue2

before sitting down to contemplate her dinner options, or where that handsome male leopard might be, or maybe even the answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe, and everything [which we all know is 42].

We (our safari jeeps and a couple others) proceeded to follow her for almost a half hour as she leisurely strolled through the bush, apparently with no particular destination in mind or even any concern about us. You can see her pass between jeeps here, stopping only momentarily to look at us and continue on her way. I imagine this happens to this gorgeous gal a lot. (The guides who work the Okavango Delta are very good and know the animals, their habits, and their habitats. They might not be able to find every animal you wish to see, some are too rare or too shy, but they know where the big cats are hanging out!)

She decided she’d had enough of us shortly after this, walking a bit further away (I love this one picture – on the left – because I captured her in the act of lifting her foot and you can see her foot pad). She sat behind a tree for a few minutes and then disappeared into the bush.

It was a wonderful way to say goodbye to the Delta.

 

Is there anything cuter than a baby elephant?

Silly question. Of course not.

So here’s a picture of a baby elephant w/mama, nursing.

nursing_baby_elephant

This was one of the local herds. They were there in the mornings, enjoying the watering hole across the road from our camp. (This, by the way, is an example of the differences between dry season safaris and wet season safaris. As the dry season progresses, and the number of watering holes diminish, all the animals congregate closer together. So – in November – on that cusp between dry and wet, the animals came to us. In the wet season, they have more options, so disperse more widely. I’m told there’s a LOT more driving on those safaris.)

The herd seemed somewhat habituated to humans, but that certainly doesn’t mean they trusted all of us, especially when there were babies present. You’ll see in this photo series, a baby who’s separated a bit from the others, but as soon as the herd noticed we were watching, the adults rushed in to keep the little ones closer.

We maintained our distance, of course, as instructed, but still there was at least one elephant who would stand sentry. Given the matriarchal nature of elephant herds, we imagine this is an auntie who’s keeping an eye on us. auntie_watching

There were at least three babies with this herd, but it wasn’t always possible to get good pictures of all of them, so I thought I’d end with this cute little one following mama, finally having had enough of us spectators. mama_and_baby