Mystery Safari Photo

Do you know what this is?  To state the obvious, yes, it’s a bird. (I have to include that comment for certain friends of mine who would immediately respond with that answer to the question. Yes, you. You know who are.)

Mystery_Bird

 

But what kind of bird? Hmmmmm……

This photo was taken in Botswana, specifically in a marshy area of the Okavango Delta.

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Time for…The Birds!

Well, just one bird tonight, but I think you’ll agree that this little gal (or guy) is spectacular enough to have a blog posting all to itself.

I give you the lilac-breasted roller, one of the more common birds you’ll encounter in southern Africa. (The roller family of birds are so-named because of the acrobatic rolls they perform while flying.) lilac_bird

Isn’t she gorgeous? They’re easy to spot because of their bright plumage and because they like to perch up high in trees like this. I have many photos of these birds from most every location we visited, but this is one of my favorites (even though – if you zoom in – you’ll see the bird is not in perfect focus). There’s a couple of reasons: 1) the soft gray cloudy sky gives it a solid background for contrast and 2) because of the different textures of the two tree branches in front combined with the way they’re blurred because they are not my focal point. I do violate the rule of thirds for photography by having the bird in the center of the photo, but the branches and their textures are in the left third, drawing your eyes that way, so maybe we’ll just think of those photography rules as being more like guidelines anyway.

Lion around

Yes, that title is a terrible pun. But I love puns, so there.

These lovely ladies are obviously very relaxed, and their bellies full, enjoying an afternoon snooze. Our safari jeeps were only parked a few feet away but they paid us little to no attention.

jeepbetweencats

What’s interesting about these scenes, however, is what’s downwind from the lionesses. It’s hard to tell from this picture of our jeeps, but the lions are just to the left out of frame and just to the right out of frame is a large bush. Inside that bush, gnawing on the remains of whatever that rib cage belonged to, is a leopard.  (Yum! Does that come with honey-flavored barbecue sauce?)

According to our guides, Mike and Josh, and our tour leader Andre, the leopard was fully aware that the lionesses were only a couple yards away because the wind was blowing in her direction. But should the wind change, they cautioned, alerting the lionesses to the presence of another predator so close by…well…those sleeping lions wouldn’t have been sleeping any more.

We patiently waited, circling slowly and quietly in our vehicles, but the lionesses snoozed away and the leopard kept chewing. No fighting. No territorial disputes. Just dinner and a long nap. This wonderful close up shot was taken by our leader Andre.

leopardcloseup

 

Is there anything cuter than a baby elephant?

Silly question. Of course not.

So here’s a picture of a baby elephant w/mama, nursing.

nursing_baby_elephant

This was one of the local herds. They were there in the mornings, enjoying the watering hole across the road from our camp. (This, by the way, is an example of the differences between dry season safaris and wet season safaris. As the dry season progresses, and the number of watering holes diminish, all the animals congregate closer together. So – in November – on that cusp between dry and wet, the animals came to us. In the wet season, they have more options, so disperse more widely. I’m told there’s a LOT more driving on those safaris.)

The herd seemed somewhat habituated to humans, but that certainly doesn’t mean they trusted all of us, especially when there were babies present. You’ll see in this photo series, a baby who’s separated a bit from the others, but as soon as the herd noticed we were watching, the adults rushed in to keep the little ones closer.

We maintained our distance, of course, as instructed, but still there was at least one elephant who would stand sentry. Given the matriarchal nature of elephant herds, we imagine this is an auntie who’s keeping an eye on us. auntie_watching

There were at least three babies with this herd, but it wasn’t always possible to get good pictures of all of them, so I thought I’d end with this cute little one following mama, finally having had enough of us spectators. mama_and_baby

If it’s Tuesday, this must be Botswana

I’ve already written about the hyena who visited us on our first night camping at the Okavango Delta, but there were a great many more animals who came wandering past. Most of them skirted the edges of the camp, but we were told that some would walk through in the dark when no people were out and about.

And every morning we would wake up to scenes like this behind our tent (in our backyard, as it were):

backyard

This was just one morning, a mixed herd of zebra and wildebeest.

To the other side, across the dirt road leading to the camp, the elephants would come to drink and eat, or bathe themselves. Some mornings there would be a lone bull or two, other mornings there would be whole families…with little ones!  (I’ll save those photos for next time.) For now, here’s this guy (or gal) stuffing himself full of the green stuff.

elephant

 

 

So, what’s it like camping in the African bush?

The safari companies treat you well, that’s for sure. Despite the relative roughness of our campsite in the Moremi Game Reserve, Okavango Delta, it was our favorite place of all the accommodations. bedsThe cots were very comfortable, the tents breezy, and fresh water drawn for you from the river every morning…all nice & warmed up to wash your face. They’d even heat up the afternoon shower water delivery but, trust me, in that heat and after a day’s activities, it was so much more refreshing to stand underneath a cool shower.shower (Those poor guys – carrying all those buckets back and forth from the river!)

Then, of course, there was our outhouse bathroom – attached to the back of the tent so we didn’t have to go outside at night.

Oh, and to show you just how warm it was, here’s a picture taken by our fellow traveler Xandra, of a thermometer her and her mom had up in their tent. This was late afternoon – after the “room” had been neatened up and the staff zipped up all the flaps. (We never figured out why they did that – we just unzipped everything when we got back to cool the tent back down.)

outhouse

temp

tents